Scottish Isle of Barra Mourns Teenage Terror Victim with Island Flag

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The Barra flag is not yet officially registered, but it enjoys a great deal of local support on the small island in the Outer Hebrides. The tragic death of a teenage girl from Barra in the Manchester Arena bombing has made the island’s green and white Nordic Cross flag more widely known.

A 14-year-old schoolgirl, Eilidh MacLeod, from the island of Barra in the Western Isles of Scotland was one of the 22 adults and children who were killed in the Manchester bombing on 22 May 2017. Her friend, 15-year-old Laura MacIntyre, also from Barra, was critically injured in the Islamist terrorist attack and is still fighting for her life.

A week ago today, on Monday 5 June, Eilidh MacLeod’s funeral service was held in the Roman Catholic Church of Our Lady Star of the Sea in Castlebay, the main village on Barra. Hundreds of mourners, many of them her relatives and childhood friends, participated in the funeral procession to Vatersay, a small island adjacent to Barra, where she was laid to rest.

Barra has a population of around 1,000. Vatersay, connected to Barra by a short causeway, is the southernmost inhabited island in the Outer Hebrides. The islands have a large percentage of Gaelic speakers and the Outer Hebrides, or Western Isles, comprise the only Scottish local government area with a Gaelic-only name: Comhairle nan Eilean Siar.

For some time now a Nordic Cross flag has been in widespread but unofficial use on Barra. It is green with a white cross. Like other islands and traditional counties in the northern and western parts of Scotland the isle of Barra has found flag inspiration in its Norse heritage and cultural ties to Scandinavia.

The exact design of the island’s flag has not yet been decided. Hence the shade of the green colour and the shape of the cross still vary. In order to be official the Barra flag must be registered with the highest heraldic and vexillological authority in Scotland: the Court of the Lord Lyon.

A formal registration is to be expected at some point in the future. The effort to get the flag of Barra officially recognized is supported by Alasdair Allan, a minister in the SNP government and the member of the Scottish Parliament for the Western Isles since 2007. In 2016 he commented:

“The feeling at the initial meeting was that recognition of the flag would help boost the island’s marketing efforts as well as celebrate its unique identity. There is already widespread use of Barra’s flag which can already be seen flying from fishing boats, on local produce and on car stickers.”

When a chartered plane with Eilidh MacLeod’s coffin landed on the beach runway of Barra Airport on Saturday 3 June the coffin was covered in the Barra flag. The green and white flag of Barra was flying at half mast when the young girl’s funeral procession passed her local school two days later.

 

Read also The Flag That Could Have Been Greenland’s. Sven Tito Achen’s design for a Greenlandic flag in 1985 was also green with a white Nordic Cross.

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Copenhagen 1892: Flags at the Royal Golden Wedding Anniversary

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The last time there was a royal golden wedding anniversary in Denmark was in 1892. A flag decorated Copenhagen celebrated the happy marriage of King Christian IX and Queen Louise. Empress Maria Feodorovna of Russia, their daughter, may have inspired a peculiar Saint Andrew’s cross flag: a merger of a Nordic swallow-tailed flag and a Russian naval ensign.

This photograph from 1892 shows a festively decorated building on the corner of Vesterbrogade and Frederiksberg Allé, two streets in Vesterbro close to the centre of Copenhagen. A number of different flags can be detected, some of them quite out of the ordinary.

Most of the flags are Danish flags, a number of them swallow-tailed. These are not naval or state flags, though. Since the 19th Century the swallow-tailed Dannebrog (the so-called splitflag) has been in wide-spread unofficial use at wedding parties, birthday celebrations etc.

There are also Norwegian and Swedish swallow-tailed flags in the black and white photo (Sweden’s blue and yellow appear a little lighter than Denmark’s red and white). Erroneously, the Norwegian and Swedish flags have two swallow tails like the Danish flag. In Norway and Sweden three tails is the norm.

The white flags with a Saint Andrew’s cross appear to be some sort of Russian flags. A white flag with a blue saltire is the naval ensign of Russia. On the building in the picture, these unofficial Russian flags are swallow-tailed like the Nordic flags.

On 26 May 1892, Christian IX and Louise had been happily married for 50 years and had been King and Queen of Denmark for more than half that time. The golden wedding celebrations in Copenhagen lasted for days. Photos and paintings from the time show that streets and houses and ships were decorated with literally thousands of flags, put up by the authorities and by private citizens.

King Christian IX and Queen Louise were known as “Europe’s parents-in-law” because their children married into prominent royal families all around the continent.

Their eldest sons became King Frederik VIII of Denmark and King George I of Greece. Their youngest son, Prince Valdemar, was suggested as a possible king of Bulgaria in 1887 and of Norway in 1905. Among their three daughters, Alexandra was married to Britain’s King Edward VII and Dagmar was married to Russia’s Emperor Alexander III. She was known as Maria Feodorovna in Russia and was the mother of the last tsar, Nicholas II.

A large number of King Christian’s and Queen Louise’s children, grandchildren, relatives and in-laws as well as foreign dignitaries gathered in Copenhagen for the celebrations. The Russian imperial yacht, the Polar Star (in Russian, Полярная звезда), lay at anchor in the harbour. The vessel was in Copenhagen not only at this occation, but rather often in fact, as the Empress loved to visit her parents and always travelled from Saint Petersburg to Denmark by ship.

Manned and commanded by the Russian Navy the imperial yacht of course flew the Russian naval ensign. This fact may explain why the Saint Andrew’s cross would have been known and used by Copenhageners to represent Russia in flag decorations in 1892.

125 years later, Queen Margrethe II of Denmark, a great-great granddaughter of King Christian IX and Queen Louise, celebrates her royal golden wedding anniversary. It was on 10 June 1967 that Princess Margrethe, then heir to the Danish throne, married Henri de Laborde de Monpezat, today known as Prince Henrik of Denmark.

Queen Margrethe and Prince Henrik have decided to celebrate their wedding anniversary in private with their family away from rolling TV cameras. So, there will be no public festivities in Copenhagen today and, it’s safe to say, far fewer flags than in 1892.

Scandinavian cross flags Scandinavians may never have heard of

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More than a thousand years after the Vikings conquered and settled parts of Scotland and England, and hundreds of years after the Dannebrog first inspired the designs of other flags, four British counties have chosen their own Scandinavian cross flags to celebrate cultural ties with Scandinavia.

1. The Shetland Islands is the northernmost part of Scotland. Together with Orkney, Shetland was raided and invaded by Norse, mostly Norwegian, Vikings as early as the 8th Century. The isles were officially part of the Kingdom of Norway until 1468.

The flag of Shetland was designed in 1969 and made official on 1 February 2005. The colours are Scottish (blue and white), the cross shape is Scandinavian. The Scandinavian, or Nordic, cross design has been adopted for all national flags and a number of other flags in the Nordic countries. Now, the design has also spread across the North Sea.

2. The Orkney Islands lie south of Shetland and north of Caithness. The Orkney flag, also known as the St. Magnus’ Cross, was adopted on 10 April 2007. The colours come from the coat of arms of the Orkney Islands Council which displays the galley of the medieval Earldom of Orkney (gold on blue) and the ax-carrying lion from the royal arms of Norway (gold on red).

3. Caithness is a county on the northern shore of mainland Scotland. The flag of Caithness was adopted on 26 January 2016. The colours represent the peatlands, the turf and the Caithness flagstone (black), the county’s beaches (gold) and the sea (blue). A golden galley with a black raven on its sail is a traditional emblem of Caithness, too. The raven was an important badge for the Vikings.

4. West Riding is a historical division of Yorkshire, the largest county in England. The West Riding of Yorkshire covers roughly half of the county’s area including cities like Leeds, Bradford and Sheffield.

The West Riding flag was adopted on 23 May 2013. It combines the white and red cross of St. George, patron saint of England, with the Scandinavian cross design. Norse, mostly Danish, Vikings ruled the Kingdom of Jórvik (York) in the 9th and 10th Centuries. The White Rose of York is a traditional Yorkshire emblem. The rose-en-soleil badge with a white rose and a blazing sun was used by the royal House of York (14th-15th Century) as well as by the West Riding Council (1927-1974).