The Prince Who Wanted To Be King Got A King’s Crown On His Flag

Skærmbillede 2018-02-19 kl. 02.08.00

In 2002 the personal flag of Prince Henrik of Denmark was changed: a heraldic crown for a prince was replaced by that for a king. In 2005 his title was upgraded from HRH Prince Henrik to HRH The Prince Consort. But he never got the equal status with his wife that he really wanted.

When Princess Margrethe succeeded her father in 1972 and became HM Margrethe II, Queen of Denmark, new royal flags were adopted. The so-called King’s flag had to be changed to fit the new Queen as she had also made changes to the royal coat of arms. For centuries the personal flag of the Danish monarch has had the royal arms in the middle of a splitflag, the swallow-tailed version of the Danish national flag, the Dannebrog.

A “flag for HRH Prince Henrik” was also adopted in 1972. It was similar to the flag of the new Queen, but instead of the royal arms it has the Prince’s coat of arms as a knight of the Royal Danish Order of the Elephant in the centre. Prince Henrik became a knight of this old and prestigious order in 1967 when he married the heir to the Danish throne.

Prince Henrik’s coat of arms as a knight of the Elephant combines the arms of Denmark (three lions and nine waterlily pads in a field of gold) with the arms of the Prince’s own French family, de Laborde de Monpezat (a lion and three stars in a field of red). The shield is supported by two golden lions, and on top of a mantle lined with ermine there was originally a crown appropriate for a royal prince.

This particular heraldic crown for a prince has three visible arches and a pearl on top.

The Danish system of different types of heraldic crowns for kings, princes, counts, barons etc. stems from the 17th Century. It was the version of the Prince Henrik’s coat of arms with a prince’s crown that was used on his personal the flag for 30 years.

“It will be changed,” it was announced in 2002 by Nils G. Bartholdy, Senior Archivist and Heraldic Consultant at the Danish National Archives, “because fundamentally it has been a mistake to use the crown for a prince in Prince Henrik’s coat of arms when displayed outside of Frederiksborg Castle.”

Bartholdy explained in an article in the newspaper Ekstra-Bladet that all members of the royal family correctly use the royal crown (the crown for a king) on all flags, pennants, monograms and elsewhere.

The royal crown, the king’s crown, has five visible arches and an orb and a cross on top.

All of Prince Henrik’s flags and pennants were upgraded accordingly. At the time, the Royal Court refuted any relation between this correction of an old mistake and the Prince’s public dissatisfaction with his status and role in the Royal Family. From 2002 onwards Prince Henrik often expressed that he felt discriminated against: “In Denmark, the wife of a king becomes a queen, but the husband of a queen is only a prince”.

Later the shield with Prince Henrik’s coat of arms as a knight of Order of the Elephant was also changed to feature a king’s crown instead of a prince’s. This shield hangs in the chapel of the Royal Danish Orders at Frederiksborg Castle. However, right now it is part of the decorations at the castrum doloris in the chapel of Christiansborg Palace where Prince Henrik is lying in state until the funeral service on Tuesday 20 February.

 

This is part 3 in a series about Prince Henrik of Denmark. Read also:
Prince Henrik of Denmark dies at 83
FLAG FAIL: Royal Flags Fly In The Dark Without Proper Lighting

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FLAG FAIL: Royal Flags Fly In The Dark Without Proper Lighting

Skærmbillede 2018-02-18 kl. 12.03.32

While the personal flag of Prince Henrik of Denmark covering his coffin was well-lit when the Prince left the royal residence in Copenhagen for the last time, other royal flags were flying at half mast over Amalienborg without proper lighting. On a grey and rainy February day, the decision to fly the royal flags after sunset was a bit of a mistake.

Prince Henrik, husband of Queen Margrethe II of Denmark, died at the age of 83 on Tuesday 13 February 2018 at the Palace of Fredensborg. The funeral service will take place on Tuesday 20 February in the chapel of the Palace of Christiansborg.

Thursday 15 February at 10 a.m. the Prince’s body was driven from Fredensborg to Copenhagen. The coffin was draped in the Prince’s personal flag which is a variant of the national flag of Denmark, with swallow tails like other Danish royal and state flags and a white square in the middle of the cross decorated with the Prince’s royal coat of arms.

The hearse was followed by cars carrying the widow of the departed, Queen Margrethe, and their two sons, Crown Prince Frederik and Prince Joachim, together with their wives and children. In the royal residence of Amalienborg, the coffin was guarded by sailors from the Royal Yacht Dannebrog and soldiers from the Royal Life Guards.

The transfer of the Prince’s remains from Amalienborg to the palace chapel at Christiansborg was scheduled to be on Friday 16 February at 6 p.m. Christiansborg is the political centre of Denmark; the palace houses the Danish Parliament, Folketinget, and the Danish Supreme Court, Højesteret.

Until the funeral the Prince is lying in state in the palace chapel and for three days it will be possible for the public to visit this castrum doloris. Yesterday 5,081 Danes paid their respects to Prince Henrik at Christiansborg and many more are expected to queue up to do likewise today and tomorrow.

Had the transfer from Amalienborg to Christiansborg taken place an hour earlier, the unfortunate break with flag protocol would not have happened. The sun set in Copenhagen at 17:13 on Friday. 50 minutes later, when the Prince’s hearse left Amalienborg accompanied by a cortege of the Royal Family with thousands of onlookers lining the route in the rain, it was already dark.

Earlier Friday the Royal Danish Court had announced that the flag flying at half mast over the residence of Queen Margrethe and Prince Henrik, was to “be taken down at 6 p.m. and not at sunset, as a farewell to the Prince”.

As a grey and rainy Copenhagen afternoon grew darker and darker in the hour before 6 p.m. live TV transmission from the royal residence documented that the Queen’s flag, the Crown Prince’s flag and the other royal flags at Amalienborg ought to have been taken down at sunset.

If there is no proper lighting of a flagpole, it is not permissible to fly a flag in the dark as it is not possible to distinguish it from other flags, commercial logo banners or any type of textile.

Sometimes it makes good sense to break with protocol. These days Danes show their respect and love for Prince Henrik and his mourning family in many different ways. Henrik was a colourful and sometimes unconventional prince. However, the idea to fly the flag over the royal residence after sunset when there are no means to illuminate the flagpoles at Amalienborg seems misguided. It has never been considered a sign of respect to fly the flag in the dark, not even when mourning the death of a prince.

 

This is part 2 in a series about Prince Henrik of Denmark. Read also:
Prince Henrik of Denmark dies at 83
The Prince Who Wanted To Be King Got A King’s Crown On His Flag

Prince Henrik of Denmark dies at 83

Skærmbillede 2018-02-20 kl. 07.02.04

These are the flags in the life of the Frenchman who came of age in Vietnam and became a Prince of Denmark when he married the future Queen Margrethe II in 1967. Tuesday 13 February 2018 he passed away at Fredensborg Palace where half of his ashes will be interred in the palace garden. The other half will be spread at sea in Danish waters.

Henri Marie Jean André de Laborde de Monpezat was born i Talence in the south-west of France [1] on 11 June 1934. At the end of his life, after 50 years in Denmark, Prince Henrik described himself as Danish, but he was always also very French. Following his death he is praised in France for his lifelong ambassadorship on behalf of French culture and the French language.

Until the age of 5 he lived with his family in Hanoi in what was then French Indochina and after WWII he returned to Vietnam and graduated there in 1952. His first childhood memories were from Hanoi and of the Vietnamese cuisine. As a young man he studied Vietnamese and Chinese in Paris, Hong Kong and Saigon. In the 1950s Vietnam was torn between the communist Democratic Republic of Vietnam [2] and the anti-communist Republic of Vietnam [3].

Prince Henrik also studied law and political science at the University of Sorbonne and after serving in the French Army in Algeria from 1959 till 1962 he became a diplomat. It was during his time as a Secretary at the French Embassy in the UK [4] that he met Princess Margrethe, daughter of King Frederik IX and heir to the Danish throne.

The couple was married in Copenhagen on 10 June 1967. The 32-year-old Henri de Monpezat became Prince Henrik of Denmark [5]. They had two sons, Frederik in 1968 and Joachim in 1969. Prince Henrik’s first visits to the Faroe Islands [6] and Greenland [7] were in the early 1970s. The Danish Royal Family has close and cordial ties with these two autonomous countries within the Kingdom of Denmark.

In 1972 Princess Margrethe became Queen Margrethe when her father died. Prince Henrik was still “just” Prince Henrik. Later in life it became apparent that he had never fully accepted his role as a queen’s husband. In the Danish public, some criticized that he never learned to speak Danish perfectly and felt that he was “too French”, others loved the Prince for his colourful, creative and sometimes unconventional sides.

Prince Henrik travelled extensively on behalf of Danish industrial and commercial interests and he was the patron of a large number of organisations and charities. He played a pivotal role in establishing Europa Nostra, a European federation for cultural and natural heritage, and the Danish branch of WWF, the international nature conservation fund. He took over from his mother-in-law Queen Ingrid in 2001 as the royal patron of the Danish Red Cross [8].

From 1972 he had his own flag, a version of the Danish national flag with swallow-tails and the Prince’s coat of arms in the middle. In the above 1970s photograph Prince Henrik can be seen with another flag, a heraldic banner of his arms [9] quartering the arms of Denmark (three lions in gold) with the arms of the Monpezat family (a lion in red). This banner was also used at the Prince’s vineyard Château de Cayx near Cahors in southern France.

The other two flags in the picture are the British club pennant, a so-called burgee, of the Royal Yacht Squadron [10] and that special Danish yacht flag [11] used only by members of the Royal Danish Yacht Club (Kongelig Dansk Yachtklub). The flag is similar to the Danish naval ensign and has the letters Y.F. for “yacht flag” and three stars, all in gold, in the upper hoist.

Sailor, tennis player, poet, art collector, sculptor, pianist, writer, wine producer, food connaisseur. Prince Henrik was a man of many, many interests and abilities. He was a bon vivant, a man who loved life, it has been rightly said. He was a beloved husband and patriarch of a growing family. All over Denmark flags are lowered to half mast to honour the Prince Consort of Denmark. His funeral service will be on Tuesday 20 February.

 

This is part 1 in a series about Prince Henrik of Denmark. Read also:
The Prince Who Wanted To Be King Got A King’s Crown On His Flag
FLAG FAIL: Royal Flags Fly In The Dark Without Proper Lighting